Mon Oncle (1958) & The Cinema of Jacques Tati

Mon Oncle (1958) & The Cinema of Jacques Tati

The source is at the center of things -- at the origin of a motion, which is both endless and inexplicable by the action of an external force; we are obliged to assume that there is a motive-power which is both infinite and internal, which we call the soul. 

The Cinema of Jacques Tati takes a philosophical position on compositional space & time — challenging its ontology by asking: 

What does it mean to be a fixed performance?

The definition has it meaning to be "rendered stable or permanent."

How does the Cinema differ from Theater
(which is ephemeral,
disappearing forever the moment it shows itself)?

Staging, for Tati, although still serving as a vital element in the narrative, is not the source of the narrative — transforming characters into icons; characters like cartoon-stickers; everything in a larger context, actively in "big picture" composition.

There are no close-ups.

Each shot is an attempt at capturing an exceptional and singular moment — a moment almost forced into a physical space, guided by a minimally-designed plot.

As a boy and his uncle fumble through the suburbs of Paris, crowds spiral & move like galaxies. Sounds are isolated, types of movements cataloged, games appear via depth-of-field, environments captured visceral, on the edge of a harmony.

The playful depiction of the vanity of the Industrial-Technological Democratic domestic lifestyle is used to reflect an invisible rhythm in our actual lives. And it hits the effect.

Something primary, something poetical; seemingly, of the Universe and of the micro-cosmos; of the immensity of the atom.

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