The Disconnect Between Movie Poster & Movie

The Disconnect Between Movie Poster & Movie

Some days I think a filmmaker is really nothing but a poster maker. Just look at the poster of "The Go-Go Boys" (2014). It's super exciting. It not only looks over the top, but it also looks expensive. There's something about the layering, and texturing, and familiar brands that says money (well, and the flying wads of money - they also convey 'money'). 

But the movie itself is quite tedious. It's nothing compared to "Electric Boogaloo: The Wild, Untold Story of Cannon Films" (2014). Go-Go Boys is clearly an attempted (and charmingly on-point) cash grab by Golan & Globus. But hey! I watched it anyways cause I'm on a Cannon kick.

The blah quality of the movie doesn't mean it won't make money. As all readers of this blog know, quality isn't the primary deciding factor on why a movie makes money.

The relationship between a movie poster and its movie is to catalyze sales. The poster (and things like the poster - advertising materials, trailers, etc) asks for your money; the movie satisfies you to the point of not asking for your money back. Just enough, not too much.

The lesson?

To succeed as a filmmaker, each one of your movies will NEED an AMAZING POSTER.

Your poster IS the sale. Because people decide to pay for your movie before they see it.

And that's it. That's filmmaking.

It's all about the pre-purchase attention grab, the social hype, & viewer intrigue.


PS: Now, the trick is to sneak into the movie quality aesthetics...


Chekhov's "At Sea"

Chekhov's "At Sea"

CANNON FILM'S BUSINESS PLAN

CANNON FILM'S BUSINESS PLAN